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Bento Box & Chopsticks Set [ Roxanne Anjou Closet ]

Measurements: 6"L x 1.8"H x 4"W
Price: $18.99

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Retail Price: $29.99
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3 people saved this item


Gently used

Neither the Bento Box or Chopstick have been used but there are light scratches visible on very cose examination.


***A Great Additional Discount Is Available!!---Click on my Name Directly Above ( "Listed by...") to learn about my Multi-Sale Discount Offer in my Closet Profile****Don't resign this compact and adorable Bento Box and Chopsticks (9") Set to carrying just your Sushi or Tonkatsudon! Carry as many lunch or snack delicacies ( American, French, Spanish and so on...) as you desire in this wonderful Black Box, decorated with open fans of Red and Gold, and its secure, easy-to-open inner latch. And if you're all thumbs with chopsticks, you can always use these lovely black utensils to secure your topknot or chignon; with textured points and top ends decorated with waves of blue and breezes of white accented with golden lines, they slip quickly into their slide-to-open black box---decorated with its own quartet of dancing crabs. ***Bento is a single-portion takeout or home-packed meal common in Japanese cuisine. A traditional bento holds rice, fish or meat, with pickled or cooked vegetables, usually in a box-shaped container. There are similar forms of boxed lunches in the Philippines (Baon), Korea (Dosirak), Taiwan (Biandang), and India (Tiffin). Also, Hawaiian culture has adopted localized versions of bento featuring local tastes after over a century of Japanese influence in the islands. The origin of bento can be traced back to the late Kamakura Period (1185 to 1333), when cooked and dried rice called hoshi-ii was developed. Hoshi-ii can be eaten as is or boiled with water to make cooked rice, and is stored in a small bag. In the Azuchi-Momoyama Period (1568 to 1600), wooden lacquered boxes like today's were produced and bento would be eaten during a hanami or a tea party. In the Edo Period (1603 to 1867), bento culture spread and became more refined. Travelers and sightseers would carry a simple koshibento ("waist bento"), consisting of several onigiri wrapped with bamboo leaves or in a woven bamboo box. One of the most popular styles of bento, called makuno-uchi bento ("between-act bento"), was first made during this period. People who came to see Noh and Kabuki ate specially prepared bentos between maku (acts). Numerous cookbooks were published detailing how to cook, how to pack, and what to prepare for occasions like Hanami and Hinamatsuri. In the Meiji Period (1868 to 1912), the first ekibent or ekiben, "train station bento") was sold. There are several records that claim where ekiben was first sold, but it is believed that it was sold on 16 July 1885, at the Utsunomiya train station, and contained two onigiri and a serving of takuan wrapped in bamboo leaves. As early schools did not provide lunch, students and teachers carried bentos, as did many employees. "European" style bentos with sandwiches also went on sale during this period. In the Taisho period (1912 to 1926), the aluminum bento box became a luxury item because of its ease of cleaning and its silver-like appearance. Also, a move to abolish the practice of bento in school became a social issue. Disparities in wealth spread during this period, following an export boom during World War I and subsequent crop failures in the Tohoku region. A bento too often reflected a student's wealth, and many wondered if this had an unfavorable influence on children both physically, from lack of adequate diet, and psychologically, from a clumsily made bento or the richness of food. After World War II, the practice of bringing bentos to school gradually declined and was replaced by uniform food provided for all students and teachers. Bentos regained popularity in the 1980s, with the help of the microwave oven and the proliferation of convenience stores. Handmade bentos have made a comeback, and they are once again a common, although not universal, sight at Japanese schools. Bentos are still used by workers as a packed lunch, by families on day trips, for school picnics and sports days etc. The bento, made at home, is wrapped in a furoshiki cloth, which acts as both bag and table mat. Airports also offer an analogous version of the ekiben: a bento filled with local cuisine, to be eaten while waiting for an airplane or during the flight.


Brand:

Other

Measurements:

6"L x 1.8"H x 4"W


Estimated U.S. Delivery

Wed 12/14/16 - Sun 12/18/16 (4-8 days)

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Roxanne Anjou

Roxanne Anjou

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